Miscellaneous

Machine Translation vs. Human Translators

Last year, a group of Israeli journalists used an online machine translation tool to translate an email for the Dutch Consulate in Tel Aviv. The message should have been about an upcoming visit to the Netherlands for a seminar on Dutch politics. However, the final result was nothing close to that and they ended up asking the Dutch minister some senseless questions about his mother.

read more
On August 12, 2010, posted in: Miscellaneous by

What does XML mean to you?

XML means a lot of different things to different people. Some think it is “the Answer to Life, the Universe, and Everything”, others describe it as generation X’s childhood sandpit dreams coming true. And although it might have already reached mainstream, there is still a lot of urban myth floating about when it comes to the question of what XML actually is. So let us have a quick look why everybody seems to love XML, why already more and more large corporations use XML to save a lot of money, and finally how XML is going to creep into the lives of everyday computer users – and to be honest, it’ll be a relief when that happens!

read more
On August 12, 2010, posted in: Miscellaneous by

Basics About Chinese Names

Thinking of going to China for business and having your business cards translated? You may want to consider this: What will your name sound like to potential Chinese business partners?

read more
On August 12, 2010, posted in: Miscellaneous by

Your Clients are Going Global – Can You Keep Up?

As more companies conduct business globally, their printing needs often involve more foreign language translation and typesetting. Being able to meet such growing needs may give your business a major competitive advantage. So, have you considered adding translation and typesetting to your printing offerings?

read more
On August 12, 2010, posted in: Miscellaneous by

Seeing the Big Picture – Huiping Iler's Icebreaker Speech at Toastmaster' International

A few summers ago, I interviewed a summer student. He was doing his graduate studies in political science at the time. From his resume, I could tell that he had political ambitions. My question for him was, if you had a choice between working as an auto assembly worker and a position in the political science field with long term potential but less pay, which one would you pick? I thought this might have been a fairly difficult question but it did not take him long to reply. “I think I’d work for Chrysler’s any day, who can say no to good pay and benefits?”

read more
On August 12, 2010, posted in: Miscellaneous by